Inside The Royal Palace Of Madrid

Inside The Royal Palace Of Madrid

The Royal Palace of Madrid is the official residence of the royal family of Spain in Madrid city. It is the largest Palace in Western Europe and one the largest in the world. You can witness centuries of Spanish history and culture inside the Royal Palace of Madrid. The Palace has been home to Kings of Spain from Charles III to Alfonso XIII. It's one of the few places that are open to the public to visit. Around 2 million people visit annually to witness the historical rooms, art and treasure inside the Royal Palace of Madrid.

The Palace is built in the form of a square that looks out over a large courtyard with a parade ground and galleries, and it is said to be inspired by the sketches Bernini made for the construction of the Louvre in Paris. You'll even get a glimpse of royal life via the stately dining room, the royal chapel, and the crown jewel of the Palace, the throne room. Home to weapons and armour used by Spanish royalty since the 13th century, it's one of the world's most impressive collections of its kind. The attractions in Royal Palace of Madrid comprise over 3000 rooms. The attraction includes The Throne room, The Royal Armoury, the Painting Gallery, Main Staircase, designed by Sabatini, Hall of Columns, Gasparini's Hall, Royal Kitchen, Gala Dining Room, Royal Chapel, and the Hall Of Halberdiers, turned into the Guards Room by Charles III.

The Throne Room

As you step inside the Royal Palace of Madrid, you will be drawn to the magnificence of the throne room. As the centrepiece of the palace since 1772, this room exudes the Spanish monarchy's grandeur. Its expansive fresco by Tiepolo depicts "The greatness and power of the Spanish monarchy," unravelling the royal family's saga leading to the prominent throne. Giovanni Battista Natali, an Italian maestro, crafted the lavish furniture and throne that stands guarded by golden lions and statues of Minerva and Apollo. With red velvet walls and intricate details, this room captures the essence of royal opulence and history in one glance.


Read more about: The Throne Room

Royal Armory

When you wander inside Royal Palace of Madrid, make sure to head to, the Royal Armory, which is known for its magnetic allure. More than just a display, it stands as a world-renowned museum of warfare and defence. Charles III's foresight ended the tradition of gifting armours, enabling visitors like you to marvel at this vast collection. Showcasing hundreds of weapons, from Spanish to Moorish, its historical tapestry unravels Spain's dominance during the Renaissance. The intricate armours of Charles V and Philip II highlight its treasured assortment. Moreover, as Europe's most significant along with Vienna's Imperial Armoury, it's a testament to regal might and artistry.


Read More about: Royal Armory

Hall Of Columns

During your exploration of the Royal Palace of Madrid Inside, the Hall of Columns stands out as a testament to centuries-old grandeur. A space once resonating with official balls and pivotal treaty signings, it's steeped in history. It is here where you will be captivated by the dominant bronze sculpture of Charles V, though it's a replica of the original housed in the Prado Museum. The intricately painted vault overhead captures the sun, a metaphor for the monarch, illuminating the hall. Moreover, this room is a blend of ceremonial importance and artistic brilliance, from Belgian tapestries to frescoes narrating royal chronicles.


Read More about - Hall of Columns

Main Staircase

Main Staircase, stands as an emblem of majesty and grandeur during your tour of the Royal Palace of Madrid Inside. As you ascend its 72 marble steps, the sheer opulence, mirrored in the Imperial style and double level, engulfs you. Designed by Sabatini, the staircase witnessed changes over the years, yet retains its awe-inspiring beauty. At the central landing, the imposing statue of Carlos III reminds visitors of the palace's historical roots. Envisioned to showcase power and luxury, it is a testament to the artistry and vision of yesteryears' architects.


Read More about - Main Staircase

The Gasparini Salon

The Gasparini Salon unveils a tapestry of rococo elegance inside Royal Palace of Madrid. A vision of Matías Gasparini, this room stands as an epitome of ornate artistry. Initially serving as Carlos III's chamber, it now embraces guests for regal interludes post-formal receptions. Marvel at the meticulous marble floors, silver-threaded tapestries, and furnishings crafted by master European artisans. While the salon's aesthetics remain untouched, its rich history and seamless blend of international craftsmanship captivate every visitor. The Gasparini Salon is an encounter with grandeur, frozen in time.


Must Visit - Hotels Near Royal Palace of Madrid

The Stradivarius Hall

The Stradivarius Hall within the Royal Palace of Madrid captivates you with its cultural grandeur. Showcasing an unparalleled collection, you will encounter four exquisite instruments crafted by Antonio Stradivari in 1700: a viola, a cello, and two violins. These aren't just historical artefacts; they come to life during concerts, resonating with music that has charmed audiences for centuries. Beyond their sonic beauty, these instruments are a testament to the palace's rich musical legacy, making the hall a must-visit for music enthusiasts.


Must Read - Cafes Near Royal Palace of Madrid

Gala Dining Room

Within the Royal Palace of Madrid, the Gala Dining Room stands as a grand testament to opulence and history. Transitioning from the Yellow Sallet, you are ushered into a vast space due to Alfonso XII's vision of merging three rooms. This room, boasts a seating capacity for 144 guests and transforms effortlessly from a dining hall to a dance floor. Adorned with 18th-century frescoes, neo-baroque influences, and Parisian bronze chandeliers, it resonates with regality. Today, it hosts state dinners, reminding you of its enduring legacy and magnificence.

Royal Chapel

Inside the Royal Palace of Madrid, the Royal Chapel stands as an emblem of the deep ties between the Spanish monarchy and the Church. While the architectural project remains incomplete, its beauty is undeniable. The awe-inspiring dome, adorned with paintings by Sachetti and Ventura Rodriguez, contrasts the altar's austerity. You can also explore beyond the antechapel, where only the royalty used to go, and see the tribune where kings attended mass. Additionally, the Chapel's unique organ, a testament to Ferdinand VI's love for music, resonates with unparalleled sound quality.

Hall Of Halberdiers

The Hall of Halberdiers, located inside Royal Palace of Madrid, beckons you with its solemn elegance. Originally designed as a ballroom by architect Sacchetti, its purpose was transformed under Charles III to house the royal guards. Despite the vast shift from luxurious decorations to simpler Tuscan pilasters, artistry still thrives here. The ceiling boasts a mesmerizing fresco by Giambattista Tiepolo, depicting Venus and Aeneas. Mahogany furniture and exquisite artworks, including the "Family of Juan Carlos I" by Antonio López, add warmth and depth. Throughout, mahogany consoles, bronze artefacts, and masterful paintings elevate its charm, offering a blend of history and artistry.

The Hall of Mirrors

The Hall of Mirrors stands as a mesmerizing chamber of reflections and artistry inside the Royal Palace of Madrid. Designed initially for consort Maria Luisa of Parma, it mirrors the grandeur of Versailles, and offers a space where royalty dressed in historical opulence. Tomás de Castro's detailed artworks narrate tales through sculptures and paintings, each bearing significant meaning. Although past kings, like Alfonso XIII, transformed its purpose, today it harmoniously hosts the Royal Orchestra, serenading guests during grand banquets.

FAQs

Why is the Royal Palace of Madrid so famous?

The Royal Palace of Madrid is the official residence of the Spanish royal family. Although the King and Queen of Spain do not reside there currently, it has become one of the most important Baroque palaces because of its historical significance, neoclassical elements and great artwork.

Who Built the Royal Palace of Madrid?

The Royal Palace of Madrid was built by order of Philip V in the 18th century on the site of the old Alcázar fortress (a former Moorish castle). Other architects who left a significant mark inside the Royal Palace of Madrid were Sabatini, Giovanni Battista Sacchetti, Filippo Juvarra, and José Segundo de Lema.

How old is the Royal Palace of Madrid?

The construction of the Palace began in 1738 and was completed in 1764. It took 16 years to complete and even more to design it. Standing for nearly three centuries, The Royal Palace is 287 years old.

What is the best time to visit the Royal Palace of Madrid?

The best time to visit inside the Royal Palace of Madrid, is during the off- season, between October to March to view the beautiful architecture and historical jewels though, the location can get a little overcrowded at the end of December due to winter breaks and Christmas holidays.

How long is the royal Palace of Madrid tour?

Touring inside the Royal Palace of Madrid can take around 45 minutes to 2 hours, depending on whether you take the audio guide with you at the site.

thrillophilia-logo

About Us | Contact Us | Email Us: royalpalacemadridtickets@thrillophilia.com

The content and images used on this site are copyright protected and copyrights vests with the respective owners.

© 2024 www.royalpalacemadridtickets.com All rights reserved.